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BREAKING NEWS: California Court of Appeal Orders 50% Population Reduction at San Quentin

I am thrilled to provide this update: We won In re Von Staich, the habeas corpus case challenging CDCR’s mishandling of the COVID-19 crisis at San Quentin. Justice Kline wrote:

Brief on Behalf of Amici Curiae Filed in Von Staich, and an Extra Helping of Cruelty

Today I submitted an Amicus Curiae brief on behalf of the ACLU of Northern California and eighteen criminal justice scholars in In re Von Staich, another San Quentin-related COVID-19 relief

Facing Criminal Charges to Save Animals, Part IV: Planning Legal Strategy

Australian animal rights activists protesting during a criminaltrial of an activist for trespassing an animal culling operation. Part IPart IIPart III Trials of animal rights activists can be seen as

Moratorium!!! What Does It Mean?

California’s death chamber: closed. Source:Office of the Governor. Today’s stunning, forward-thinking announcement from Governor Newsom requires some careful parsing out. I am on my way to KQED, where I will

Thank You for Your Courage, Governor Newsom

Governor Newsom’s announcement of a death penalty moratorium is a breath of fresh air after decades of stagnation. Since the reinstatement of the death penalty in California, 13 inmates have

CDCR Eliminates Inmate Copayments for Health Care

Today CDCR announced that, effective March 1, they will eliminate inmate copayments for healthcare, because an internal analysis reveals that copayments “have minimal fiscal benefit and are not aligned with

Foster v. Chatman and the Limits of the Sayable

This morning, the Supreme Court decided Foster v. Chatman, a case involving race considerations in jury selection proceedings in Georgia. There are two types of challenges that the prosecution and

The Ninth Circuit: The Feds are Responsible for the Health of Inmates in Privately-Managed Prison

Petitioner Richard Nuwintore with his attorneys,Ian Wallach and Jason Feldman, after their Ninth Circuit victory Today the Ninth Circuit decided Edison and Nuwintore v. U.S.–two cases involving the government’s responsibility

SCOTUS Offers Hope for Lifers Without Parole Sentenced When They Were Juveniles

In 1963, Henry Montgomery killed a police officer. His murder conviction in Louisiana, for “guilty without capital punishment”, carried a mandatory life without parole sentence. That is, under Louisiana law,

Podcast Review: Serial

On the last episode of the acclaimed podcast Serial, Sarah Koenig speaks to a retired police detective and asks him whether any murder case would raise the difficult questions raised